Every Special Ed student is Special!

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Every Special Ed student is Special!

"We will try to do everything we can to help them get into general ed classes

“We get kids in early ed to analyze them, treat them and help them so they don’t have to enter as special ed students when they come into first grade. We will try to do everything we can to help them get into general ed classes,” Scott Schmerelson, the committee’s chairman, said during that last meeting. On Tuesday, the committee will resume their work holding their first meeting of 2017. Schmerelson made clear to LA School Report why he supports inclusion, but also that keeping the special education centers is his top priority for this year.

“Saving the special education centers is my main goal. I have a problem with the closure of the special ed centers and then the parents not having the ability to choose the best for their kids. That’s my main concern,” he said Friday. “Inclusion is great, I encourage it, but it shouldn’t be the only option to parents.”

LA Unified special education administrators highlighted early identification and intervention before the child’s third birthday as crucial to preventing the need for long-term special education when they reach school age. The students in the infant and preschool programs represent 8.4 percent of the total 84,000 special education students in LA Unified.

 School Board Approves Dyslexia Resolution

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School Board Approves Dyslexia Resolution

On x the LAUSD School Board approved Board Member Schmerelson's resolution, instructing the District to create a plan that provides teacher and staff training necessary to improve understanding dyslexia and its warning signs, appropriate evidence-based instruction and accommodations. 

Board Member Schmerelson stated, “We simply cannot allow some kids to fall farther and farther behind because of undiagnosed dyslexia and the learning and literacy problems that this condition creates. I sincerely believe that increasing early identification and effective intervention for our students with dyslexia will be life-changing for many children and their families.”

As this Ed Source article states "The demand by the board of the second-largest school district in the U.S. was hailed by parent advocates as a signal that districts across the state, and potentially the nation, might finally provide interventions that help students with dyslexia learn to read. Effective interventions are available, but most school districts nationwide do not provide them widely, citing the cost of training, according to advocates for students with disabilities.

 Among the resources that the District has created is this video.  To learn more about the dislexia and this resolution, click here.