Instructional Technology Initiative
Digital Citizenship Week 2017 Banner
  • Classroom Resources
Teach Digital Citizenship year-round. Find curated lessons from our partners to use with your students on a variety of digital citizenship concepts and competencies.

BrainPOP

Help 21st-century learners build 21st-century skills!

BrainPOP offers topics that guide students in what it means to be careful, considerate, and aware digital citizens. Explore our collection of digital citizenship resources including movies, activities, games, and planning guides.

https://www.brainpop.com/digitalcitizenship/

Digital Citizenship image

Common Sense Education

Common Sense Education provides a wealth of classroom resources to engage in digital citizenship conversations, lessons, and activities. Below you will find key grade-level resources to help you get started in supporting your students.

Grades K-5

Media Balance Is Important

Through this fun song, students will start to think about how to find a happy balance between their online and offline activities!

Discussion Questions: What was your favorite part of the song? What was one thing you learned from the song? Why should you take a break from your device when a friend says "hi"?

Pause & Think Online

From our head down to our toes, and our feet up to our nose, the Digital Citizens inspire students to be safe, responsible, and respectful online.

Discussion Questions: Which character do you relate to most when you go online? Why is it important to be kind online? Why shouldn't you open a message from someone you don't know?

We the Digital Citizens

Students explore the amazing possibilities that come with using technology and learn from the Digital Citizens, who take a pledge to travel safely on the internet.

Discussion Questions: What was one thing you learned from the Digital Citizens? Why is it a good idea to set a time limit when using technology? Why shouldn't you share your username or password with other people?

Pause, Breathe, Finish Up!

Students learn a simple routine for how to deal with being interrupted while using media.

Discussion Questions: Do you ever have a hard time pausing when you’re in the middle of watching a show or playing a game? If so, why do you think it’s hard to pause? Why do you think it's important to stop what you're doing and pause for people even if you don't want to?

My Online Neighborhood

In this video, students learn three rules for keeping their online experiences safe and fun.

Discussion Questions: What did Arms like about the internet? What kinds of things can he do online? What three rules does Arms follow when going places online?

Activities for Grades 3–5

Rings of Responsibility

Students learn about a framework -- the rings of responsibility -- to understand how to balance their responsibilities as digital citizens.

Discussion Questions: How could throwing a bottle out of your window be similar to something you do online? What are the Rings of Responsibility? Have you ever heard the term "digital citizen"? What comes to mind when you hear that term?

Private & Personal Information

Students learn about what type of information is or isn't OK to share online.

Discussion Questions: What type of information about you is OK to share? What type of information isn't? Why shouldn’t you share private information?

My Media Balance

Through this video, students learn a framework for making informed media choices to help them find media balance in their lives.

Discussion Questions: According to the video, what is media balance? How are some media choices more or less healthy than others? What does media balance look like for you?

What's Cyberbullying?

Students learn what is -- and what isn't -- cyberbullying, and get some strategies they can use to respond to it.

Discussion Questions: What is cyberbullying? What are some things you can do if you see cyberbullying?

Reading News Online

With this video, students learn how online news articles are structured. This is the first step in helping them get better at interpreting what they see online.

Discussion Questions: Why do you think it's important to know the different parts of an online news article and website? What are some things to look out for when reading a news article online? How do you think knowing more about the parts of an online news article can help you?

For more information, click here: Videos and Discussion questions

For additional resources, review the following K-2 distance learning packets: https://www.commonsense.org/education/articles/free-distance-learning-plans-for-k-2-students-and-their-families

Grades 6-8

Teen Voices: Presenting Yourself Online

Students explore the benefits and drawbacks of presenting themselves in different ways online.

Discussion Questions: Why do people create and use fake social media accounts (e.g. finstas)? What are some of the results of having and using these accounts? How do you present yourself online?

Teen Voices: Who You're Talking to Online

Hear what other teens have to say about talking to others online. Students reflect on how to keep online friendships safe and positive.

Discussion Questions: What are some of the benefits and risks of talking with people online that you don't know face-to-face? What's one comment in the video you agree with, and why? What do you share with others online?

Teen Voices: Dealing with Digital Drama

Students hear teens give their honest thoughts and opinions on the topic of digital drama. They explore ways to cope with it in their lives or maybe even avoid it altogether.

Discussion Questions: What is digital drama? What are some examples? Why does digital drama happen? What are some ways to deal with it?

Teen Voices: Friendships and Social Media

In this video, students can hear what other teens have to say about their social media lives and friendships, and can think critically about how social media affects their own relationships.

Discussion Questions: What do you think are some of the benefits of social media? What some problems or drawbacks? How does/can social media affect your friendships?

Teen Voices: The Pressure to Stay Connected

Students hear what other teens have to say about how digital media has them feeling "hooked," and can then start to think critically about their own digital media use.

Discussion Questions: What are some things you like to do on your phone or other devices? Do you do these things out of habit? How do you deal with the pressure to stay connected?

Discussion Questions: What are some things you like to do on your phone or other devices? Do you do these things out of habit? How do you deal with the pressure to stay connected?

For more information, click here: https://www.commonsense.org/education/articles/5-quick-video-discussion-activities-for-middle-school

Grades 9-12

Teen Voices: Who Are You on Social Media?

Students reflect upon how they can create a social media presence that represents their real selves.

Discussion Questions: How do you curate your life on social media? Which perspectives stood out to you in the video? Which did you agree or disagree with? Why?

Teen Voices: Hate Speech Online

Teens share their thoughts about online hate speech, including why they think it happens and how it affects them.

Discussion Questions: What is hate speech? Have you ever encountered hate speech online? Why do you think people post hate speech? How does hate speech affect you? Others? All of us?

When Is Your Brain Ready for Social Media?

With this video, students think critically about the best age for kids to start using social media.

Discussion Questions: At what age do you think you were mature enough to handle all the pros and cons of social media? What are the arguments for and against having an age requirement? Which side do you agree with? Why?

Civil Discourse Online

Students consider how to advocate for positive change and find common ground with others, even in times of great disagreement.

Discussion Questions: What are some of the big takeaways from Cameron Kasky's story? What does Kasky say about debating with people who disagree with you? Do you agree?

Screen Time: How Much Is Too Much?

Through this video, students explore the possible health effects of screen time.

Discussion Questions: What is the difference between active and passive use? Which type of screen time do you engage in more? What screen activities do you value, and what do you want to cut out?

Discussion questions: What is the difference between active and passive use? Which type of screen time do you engage in more? What screen activities do you value, and what do you want to cut out?

For more information, click here: Videos for Critical Thinking + discussion questions

Teachers' Essential Guide to Cyberbullying Prevention

Cybersecurity Education

What is Cybersecurity Education?

Cybersecurity education is the process of teaching individuals and organizations how to protect themselves from cyber threats and attacks. It includes educating individuals on best practices for securing their digital assets and personal information, as well as how to identify and respond to potential cyber threats.Cybersecurity education can cover a range of topics, including safe internet browsing, email security, password management, social engineering awareness, malware detection, and incident response. It can be delivered through various methods, such as online courses, workshops, seminars, or formal classroom instruction.

The goal of cybersecurity education is to provide individuals with the knowledge and skills they need to protect themselves and their assets from cyber threats. It can help prevent data breaches, financial losses, and reputational damage caused by cyber attacks, and contribute to a safer and more secure digital world.

Grades K-2

CyberGenerating Student Passwords

Overview: The purpose of these activities is to empower students in increasing their personal security online through recognizing and creating strong and memorable passwords.

Objective: Students will recognize the type of information that is private and identify strategies for creating and protecting secure passwords.

https://achieve.lausd.net/cms/lib/CA01000043/Centricity/Domain/21/Student%20passwords_v1c_approved.pdf

Grades 3-5

Cyber.org LogoKeys to Cybersecurity

Lesson Key 1: Personal Identifiable Information

Overview: First, students will learn what a digital footprint and personally identifiable information are. Then, students will learn when it is safe to share personally identifiable information and whom they should share it with.

Objectives: Students will learn how to keep their digital footprint safe.

https://cyber.org/learning-modules/module-1/#/

Lesson Key 2: Online Safety

Overview: In this lesson, students will learn about some things to watch out for when using technology and how to best respond to those threats. Students will also learn why it is important not to post private information online.

Objectives: Students will learn about online safety.

https://cyber.org/learning-modules/module-2/#/

Lesson Key 3: Authentication

Overview: In this key, students will learn how to create strong passwords. Students will also discover why it’s important to use multiple ways to protect their devices and learn about different kinds of authentication.

Objectives: Students will learn about authentication.

https://cyber.org/learning-modules/module-3/#/

Lesson Key 4: Connected Devices

Overview: In this key, students will learn about the risks involved in opening unknown files and connecting to unknown devices. Students will also discover the benefits of keeping their apps and devices updated and backing up data regularly. Additionally, students will learn about the Internet of Things (IoT).

Objectives: Students will learn how to protect their connected devices.

https://cyber.org/learning-modules/module-4/#/

Grades 6-8

Cyber.org LogoKeys to Cybersecurity

Protecting Your Digital Footprint

Overview: Students will learn how to protect their devices and files when using interconnected systems like the Internet of Things (IoT).

Objectives: Students will learn about the risks and benefits of IoT devices, the importance of file backups, and hardware and software vulnerabilities.

https://cyber.org/learning-modules/module-5/#/

Online Threats and Vulnerabilities

Overview: In this key, students will learn to identify the characteristics of an email or text message that may be part of a phishing scam. Students will also become more aware of the different types of threats and vulnerabilities.

Objectives: Students will explore online threats and vulnerabilities.

https://cyber.org/learning-modules/module-6/#/

Defense in Depth

Overview: Students will learn how authentication and authorization methods can protect authorized users. Students will also learn various strategies that can help protect simple networks.

Objectives: Students will take an in-depth dive into online defenses.

https://cyber.org/learning-modules/module-7/#/

Protecting Connected Devices

Overview: For this key, Students will learn how to protect your devices and files when using interconnected systems like the Internet of Things (IoT). Students will learn about the risks and benefits of IoT devices, the importance of file backups, and hardware and software vulnerabilities.

Objectives: Students will learn how to protect their connected devices.

https://cyber.org/learning-modules/module-8/#/

Grades 9-12

Cyber.org LogoKeys to Cybersecurity

Protecting Your Digital Footprint

Overview: Students will learn how to protect their devices and files when using interconnected systems like the Internet of Things (IoT).

Objectives: Students will learn about the risks and benefits of IoT devices, the importance of file backups, and hardware and software vulnerabilities.

https://cyber.org/learning-modules/module-5/#/

Online Threats and Vulnerabilities

Overview: In this key, students will learn to identify the characteristics of an email or text message that may be part of a phishing scam. Students will also become more aware of the different types of threats and vulnerabilities.

Objectives: Students will explore online threats and vulnerabilities.

https://cyber.org/learning-modules/module-6/#/

Defense in Depth

Overview: Students will learn how authentication and authorization methods can protect authorized users. Students will also learn various strategies that can help protect simple networks.

Objectives: Students will take an in-depth dive into online defenses.

https://cyber.org/learning-modules/module-7/#/

Protecting Connected Devices

Overview: For this key, Students will learn how to protect your devices and files when using interconnected systems like the Internet of Things (IoT). Students will learn about the risks and benefits of IoT devices, the importance of file backups, and hardware and software vulnerabilities.

Objectives: Students will learn how to protect their connected devices.

https://cyber.org/learning-modules/module-8/#/

DigCit Commit

Teaching digital citizenship has never been more important. Prepare students to stay safe, solve problems, and becoe a force for good.

digcitcommit.org

DigCitCommit On February 11-12, 2020, the DigCitCommit Virtual Congress was held at Facebook HQ where featured leaders shared how digital citizenship practices can have a positive impact on the world. L.A. Unified was a featured school district spotlighted for our commitment to digital citizenship over the last five years. ITI Director, Sophia Mendoza, and PPDS, Dr. Vanessa Monterosa, took to the DigCitCommit stage to share promising practices for system-level implementation of digital citizenship from policy to practice. This session was streamed live to over 1,700 virtual attendees from around the globe.

 

DigCit For Teachers By Teachers

As part of our mission to advance digital citizenship practices among L.A. Unified educators and the broader education community, the Instructional Technology Initiative has curated these sets of digital citizenship lesson plans that are ready to be implemented in the classroom. These lessons are designed by our Instructional Technology Facilitators with a particular focus on making them “for teachers, by teachers” as framed by the ISTE Educator Standard 3 Citizen: “Educators inspire students to positively contribute to and responsibly participate in the digital world.”

These lessons will definitely inspire you and your students not just during the first ten days of school, or during Digital Citizenship Week, but all year-round!

For L.A. Unified Educators:

Grades K-2

K-2 DigCit For Teachers By Teachers: Fostering a Positive and Safe Online Classroom Community

K-2 DigCit For Teachers By Teachers: Fostering a Positive and Safe Online Classroom Community
Explore the Digital Citizenship Curriculum provided by Common Sense Education. Each lesson can be delivered within two 40-50 min lessons. The themes explored :

  • We define who we are.
  • We know the power of our words.
  • We are kind and courageous.
  • We care about everyone’s privacy.
  • We find balance in our digital life.

Grades 3-5

3-5 DigCit For Teachers By Teachers: Empowering All Learners to Become Digital Citizens

Give students the knowledge and skills to safely and productively participate in the digital world. CommonSense.org lessons teach students about media balance, digital footprint, digital interactions, privacy and media literacy. Lessons are grade-level specific and ready to launch using the platform of your choice like Nearpod, Google Slides or the commonsense.org website.

Grades 6-8

6-8 DigCit For Teachers By Teachers: Fostering Positive and Safe Online Relationships

Students will engage in a series of lessons that will help foster positive and safe online relationships. These lessons will help equip students with the knowledge, skills, and resources to succeed as lifelong learners. As they engage online they learn to engage within a digital environment with responsibility and confidence to develop as leaders who will leave meaningful impacts in their own lives and the lives of others.

Grades 9-12

9-12 DigCit For Teachers By Teachers: Building Positive Digital Citizens Through Social Emotional Learning

Positive digital citizenship is a critical skill for the modern student who will be the leaders of tomorrow. In these ten days, students will examine their social emotional self and how that translates onto digital spaces. Through the exploration of social emotional learning, students will build their capacity to be more inclusive, informed, engaged, balanced, and alert in their online presence.



For Non-L.A. Unified Educators:

Grades K-2

K-2 DigCit For Teachers By Teachers: Fostering a Positive and Safe Online Classroom Community

K-2 DigCit For Teachers By Teachers: Fostering a Positive and Safe Online Classroom Community
Explore the Digital Citizenship Curriculum provided by Common Sense Education. Each lesson can be delivered within two 40-50 min lessons. The themes explored :

  • We define who we are.
  • We know the power of our words.
  • We are kind and courageous.
  • We care about everyone’s privacy.
  • We find balance in our digital life.

Grades 3-5

3-5 DigCit For Teachers By Teachers: Empowering All Learners to Become Digital Citizens

Give students the knowledge and skills to safely and productively participate in the digital world. CommonSense.org lessons teach students about media balance, digital footprint, digital interactions, privacy and media literacy. Lessons are grade-level specific and ready to launch using the platform of your choice like Nearpod, Google Slides or the commonsense.org website.

Grades 6-8

6-8 DigCit For Teachers By Teachers: Fostering Positive and Safe Online Relationships

Students will engage in a series of lessons that will help foster positive and safe online relationships. These lessons will help equip students with the knowledge, skills, and resources to succeed as lifelong learners. As they engage online they learn to engage within a digital environment with responsibility and confidence to develop as leaders who will leave meaningful impacts in their own lives and the lives of others.

Grades 9-12

9-12 DigCit For Teachers By Teachers: Building Positive Digital Citizens Through Social Emotional Learning

Positive digital citizenship is a critical skill for the modern student who will be the leaders of tomorrow. In these ten days, students will examine their social emotional self and how that translates onto digital spaces. Through the exploration of social emotional learning, students will build their capacity to be more inclusive, informed, engaged, balanced, and alert in their online presence.

Share your digital citizenship journey through these curated lesson plans by tagging @ITI_LAUSD on Twitter with hashtag #DigCitLA.

EdPuzzle

Free Video Lessons for Digital Citizenship Week From Edpuzzle Originals

Support your students this Digital Citizenship Week with these free video lessons from Edpuzzle Originals designed for elementary, middle, and high school students.

https://blog.edpuzzle.com/free-resources/free-video-lessons-digital-citizenship-week/

EdPuzzle Digital Citizenship image

Nearpod

Digital Citizenship & Literacy

Prepare students with knowledge and skills to use technology effectively, safely, & appropriately.

https://nearpod.com/digital-citizenship

Nearpod-DigCit and Literacy

Additional Nearpod Digital Citizenship lessons and resources.

Pear Deck

Help kids learn to confidently (and safely!) explore the online world during Digital Citizenship Week! Digital Citizenship Week encourages students to take a closer look at their online footprint and become more responsible digital citizens.

Explore our library of resources from partners like Google’s Be Internet Awesome and EVERFI to spark classroom discussions about what it means to be a good digital citizen and how to implement these skills in everyday life.

https://www.peardeck.com/digital-citizenship

PearDeck-DigCit and Literacy

Seesaw

Knowing how to use technology is a lifelong skill. Like reading and long division, digital skills need to be explicitly taught – even to digital natives. Use these resources to empower students with the skills they need to lead in our digital world.

https://web.seesaw.me/lausd-resources