Work-Based Learning

  • A true Work-Based/Project-Based Learning experience combines academic and occupational training and assessment. Here are some key components:

     

    • WBL is student/worker-centered, which means that students have input into what they are going to learn and how.

     

    • Teachers/Supervisors are facilitators rather than dictators of each student’s process.

     

    • Students develop a variety of skills as articulated in the SCANS Report (see attached).
      • Basic Skills
      • Thinking Skills
      • Interpersonal Skills
      • Workplace Competencies

     

    • Academic content is integrated into occupational projects and/or classes.

     

    • Students acquire a wide variety and range of skills that are transferable to whatever job(s) they choose in the future.
      • Whereas industry-specific training is useful and important, the ultimate goal is preparation for all types of employment.
      • Ideal work-based learning situations do not allow a student to develop or even master just one specific skill at the expense of other skills necessary to survive in the world of work.

     

    • Students are extensively involved in their assessments.
      • Students self-evaluate.
      • Teachers/Supervisors and students work in conjunction to compare and contrast their perceptions of student progress.
      • Evidence of each student’s work, progress and achievement is compiled and contained in a “living,” changing portfolio that stays with the student after the work-based learning experience. This portfolio should include any written documentation of performance and evaluation as well as photos or videos of what student accomplished.